Tag Archives: marketshare

Magyarország győz!

Gratulációk!!! :)

It’s incredible. Would you believe me if I told you about a product made by an open source community of people, all gathered around a non-profit foundation could be a significant challenger to a competitor whose product is bundled with the most popular operating system on Earth?

Welcome to Hungary – a 10 mln people country in Central Europe, where according to the latest results from Gemius Weekly*, Mozilla Firefox 2 has reached the top of the browser version list there.
Of course it doesn’t mean that we’re the most popular browser in Hungary (yet!) – the number of IE 6 and IE 7 users when added together still means Microsoft has a total market share of 60%, but for the first time in the history of Mozilla project we have seen from an external and reliable data source – a country reporting Firefox topping the browser “Version” list.**

Amazing… And we’re just 10 years old. :)

Now for more hard work… we need to start thinking even further about how we can achieve our mission with a much stronger position, especially as this may soon be happening in several other countries as well ;)

Congratulations to the Hungarian Mozilla Team!

*) Gemius claims their data is reliable for the country. According to my estimations it really is (they measure over 60% of the Internet traffic in Hungary).
**) No we’re not sure if this is the first country with such result, but it’s the first measured result we know about. :)

Central Europe marketshare situation – short analysis (part 5 / Ukraine)

The fifth part of this summary focuses on Ukraine. (part 1 – Poland, part 2 – Czech Republic, part 3 – Hungary, part 4 – Lithuania)

 


Flag of Ukraine

Ukraine

 

Population: 46.8 mln
Internet users: 5.3 mln (11.5%)

Ukraine, in contrast to previously described Lithuania, is the biggest of the countries from the group I’m describing now. It’s also the only country that is bilingual. Its situation is so different to other countries that I’ll spend more time describing it before we’ll skip to browsers. Feel free to ignore that part, but you may end up asking yourself why Firefox adoption is so low here.

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Central Europe marketshare situation – short analysis (part 4 / Lithuania)

The fourth part of this summary focuses on Lithuania. (part 1 – Poland, part 2 – Czech Republic, part 3 – Hungary, part 5 – Ukraine)

 


Flag of Lithuania

Lithuania

 

Population: 3.4 mln
Internet users: 1.3 mln (36%)

Lithuania is the smallest of the countries from the group. Just 3.4 mln people,  but the country has a very long history. Constituted as a kingdom in 13th century, for a few ages in union with Poland (of course the borders were in totally different places back then), later – it was behind the Iron Curtain, together with all other countries I’m writing about in this summary.

 centraleurope-graph24And here we have first differences.

Over 70% of IE’s market share is pretty much if you compare it to the rest of Central/Eastern Europe. Also rather low adoption of Firefox is interesting.

The reason for this is that the first Firefox localized to Lithuanian has been released in June 2006 and it was Firefox 1.5.0.4. For 1,5 year after the 1.0 release, Lithuania had no localized version and currently has approximately 1/3rd less market share than the other countries from the region.

You can also notice significant market share of Opera and I also believe that it’s the result of late entrance of Firefox to the Lithuanian market.

I’ll try to prove that later.

 

Now, let’s take a look at more detailed chart of browsers versions:

Continue reading

Central Europe marketshare situation – short analysis (part 3 / Hungary)

The third part of this summary focuses on Hungary. (part 1 – Poland, part 2 – Czech Republic, part 4 – Lithuania, part 5 – Ukraine)

 


Flag of Hungary

Hungary

 

Population: 10 mln
Internet users: 3 mln (30%)

Hungary is similar in size to Czech Republic, but has fewer Internet users (ratio is similar to Poland – 30%). Usually in Eastern Europe, the lower level of the Internet connection saturation means that the market is yet waiting for it’s boom, and it’s about to begin. Hungary and Poland are both members of European Union, and in both cases the reason for such a low Internet penetration is connection price. In Poland for 512 Kb (Neostrada TP), I pay the price that in UK people pay for 8 Mb (BT Total Broadband). With the open market, we’re facing the prices to go down and I expect it’ll unblock the boom this year.

Hungary has it’s community HQ located at mozilla.fsf.hu.

centraleurope-graph19Back to numbers.

Hungary is yet another good news for Mozilla, with over 34% of the market share owned by Firefox and less than 2/3rd by IE.

Overall, Gecko has 34.9% and IE 62.9%, which places Hungary in between Poland and Czech Rep. in terms of Firefox adoption, which confirms the results from XiTi monitor.

  Continue reading

Central Europe marketshare situation – short analysis (part 2 / Czech Republic)

The second part of this summary focuses on Czech Republic. (part 1 – Poland, part 3 – Hungary, part 4 – Lithuania, part 5 – Ukraine)

 


Czech Republic flag

Czech Republic

 

Population: 10.3 mln
Internet users: 5.1 mln (50%)

Czech Republic is almost 5 times smaller than Poland, but has much better Internet penetration with 50% of its citizens connected to the Web.

Czech Republic has, similar to Poland, great and very strong Mozilla community (CZilla) founded in 2002. Group of project members with huge experience guarantees high quality and on-time releases with similar set of end-user oriented support features like we can see in Poland.

As I mentioned in part 0 of this article, Gemius has lower penetration here than for Poland. So while it still seems to be very representative, more data sources would be very useful.

 centraleurope-graph13

Let’s start the graph show with current market situation.

IE has a strong position with 67.2% which is 7.7% more than in Poland and even more than in the Polish emigrants group. Firefox has 27.5% – 5.8% less thanin Poland.

Firefox with over 1/4th and IE with 2/3rd are shaping the whole market.

 

 

To answer the question about how fast the Czech market is adopting new technologies, we can take a look at the versions graph:

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Central Europe marketshare situation – short analysis (part 1 / Poland)

The first part of this summary focuses on Poland. (part 2 – Czech Republic, part 3 – Hungary, part 4 – Lithuania, part 5 – Ukraine)

 


Flag of Poland

Poland

 

Population: 38.5 mln
Internet users: 11.4 mln (29.9%)

In case of Poland we can present two datasets (as this is the data we have from Ranking.pl) – users of the Polish Internet who come from Poland and users who come from outside of Poland.

The emigrants group is important because it brings us the numbers that should be near to Western Europe/US numbers while still in Gemius methodology.

Poland has very stable, big and well organized community lead by two projects. MozillaPL is a community project focused on self support, community activities, extension localization, and is an amazing source of energy. Aviary.pl is much smaller, task oriented group, that is considering itself as fully professional localization team, with a clear entry barrier, rules, internal structure and growing set of projects under its guide. It started as a part of MozillaPL with a goal to provide high quality localization of Firefox and Thunderbird, but now, it localizes big variety of products both commercially and non-commercially.

 

cenatrleurope-graph1

First, let’s take a look at the current market share of the most important browsers.

Yes, in contrast to the situation in western Europe, America and Asia, Opera does exists on our market and has its share, while Safari (0.1%) and the whole Mac platform are hardly visible.

Looking at the graph on the right, you can see the latest cumulative set with Microsoft Internet Explorer keeping the crown with 59.5% of the market share, Firefox being second with 33.3% and Opera being third with 5.8%.

In terms of engines, Gecko has 34% and MSIE has just dropped below 60% (59.9%) point.

 Yes. The results are different to the ones from XiTi Monitor. According to what we know, XiTi measures websites in English, French and Spanish, so they’re most representative in western Europe. For other countries they measure users from those regions who connect to the tracked websites, which distorts the results.

  Now, let’s take a look at users from outside of Poland (29% in this group is from England, 16% Germany, 14% USA, 27% other European countries, 14% rest of the world):

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Central Europe marketshare situation – short analyze (part 0)

My recent focus is on browsers situation in Europe. Especially non-western europe.  It means pretty big area with tons of countries, languages and home-grown Internet booms in the middle. I’d like to share some basic data about 5 of those basing on the data from Gemius.

Gemius is a polish company that focus on Internet statistics, profiling users for websites etc. What is good for us, is that the company is presenting weekly their merged results for “whole polish Internet” on the website ranking.pl. Which gives everyone in Poland pretty good idea on what’s going on here.

Some time ago Gemius expanded to new markets – Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Ukraine. Another thing is that due to the rising problem of “cookie deletion” the ambitious methodology of tracking “visits” had to be shifted into “tracking page views”, and I want to present you the summary of this data in case of web browsers that I think is representative for those countries and this part of Europe (1).

In the next posts I’ll be analyzing each of the countries and in summary, I’ll present the combined data for the whole region.

1) To explain why I tend to assume that Gemius data for Poland is a good estimation for population, let me show same data.
According to InternetWorldStats, Poland has around 11,5 mln Interent users. According to last Gemius weekly stats before they changed the methodology (May 2007) they tracked 19 296 045 visits during the week.
Even if we assume it’s not 100%, it’s still pretty good sampling, especially as my goal is not to measure the amount of users, but the market share trends.
For Czech Rep., InternetWorldStats says they have 5.1 million users, and Gemius in May tracked 8 million visitors during the week.
For Hungary, IWS says about 3 mln users, and Gemius tracked 3.6 mln visits.
For Lithuania, IWS says about 1.2 mln users, and Gemius tracked 1.3 mln visits
For Ukraine, IWS says about 5.3 mln users, and Gemius tracked 1.2 mln visits.

Usually, one user is doing far less than 3 visits per week which means that you can divide the visits by 3 and get estimated real users. Comparing IWS Internet users to those real users will give you a sampling.
In all those cases, beside Ukraine, we can say that it’s very representative sampling. In case of Ukraine, I still tend to believe that it’s enough to get some idea on what’s going on there.
please, bear in mind, that those are statistics. Statistics are a way to represent the data, and data represents reality. On each level there are simplifications and mistakes, and it’s up to you to decide on your own how far you trust the summary results.